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Latest News

QuakeCon 2020

25th annual QuakeCon! Celebrate the 25th annual QuakeCon with a global Super Stream, featuring 60 straight hours of nonstop live content from around the world. The schedule is packed with three days of celebrity influencer streams, live concerts, charity fundraising, ...

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New partner: HostSailor

New partner and server from HostSailor The amazing people at HostSailor.com have joined QuakeNet as partners and sponsored a new server hosted in Bucharest, Romania. You can access the server using the hostname hostsailor.ro.quakenet.org and the server will be part ...

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ESA Summer Online 2020

ESA Summer Online ESA Summer Online 2020 will be running in the place of ESA Summer, with ESA Summer postponed to October. ESA is a week-long event, with the primary goal of raising money for a charity. ESA Summer Online ...

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A Day on QuakeNet

Posted by meeb on Tuesday 16 November 2010

QuakeNet is the largest internet relay chat (IRC) Network in the world, this is an attempt to demonstrate the activity on the network (it looks much better full screen and in high def over on vimeo!).

A Day in QuakeNet from QuakeNet on Vimeo.

This is one day of activity, 24 hours, midnight to midnight in UTC, on the QuakeNet IRC network summarised into a 12 minute data visualisation.

Each dot represents a new user connecting to the network, there are some 400 new connections per minute on average in this visualisation. Users are linked by joining shared channels. When a new user joins a shared channel it is joined by a line with all other users in the channel already that have had activity within the last 5 minutes. In effect, this shows real time communications between the users of QuakeNet over a single day.

All data was collected strictly anonymously at a high level.

The data snapshots were collected via a network service that already stores connection data in memory, anonymous network data dumps (purely stating 'this user is new' information) were collected at a regular interval for a 24 hour period. These data blocks were then pre-processed using one off Python scripts into a usable cohesive time-line of connections, and the users resolved to their geographic locations.

The final visualisation was produced using processing over several hours (the original source is above 1080p) using an OpenGL renderer. The background map is a re-aligned and tweaked world map from the NASA blue marble project.

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